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Monday May 31, 2021 By David Quintanilla
Design Bridge Designed A New Rosé Concept From Winemaker Sacha Lichine | Dieline


Summer time is all about sharing a glass of rosé together with your closest associates. It is time to make a toast over Design Bridge’s London Studio’s newest collaboration with famend winemaker Sacha Lichine.

The studio took inspiration from the decadence of speakeasies of the Nineteen Twenties and carried out points of glitz and liveliness within the design. From peacocks taking part in playing cards to the bottle’s distinctive form to the usage of pink all through your entire design, the small print are dazzling. Reply me this, the place’s the closest speakeasy? I wish to make a toast.


Design Bridge are excited to share their London Studio’s newest collaboration with visionary wine producer Sacha Lichine: creating the model design and bespoke packaging for his new rosé wine, The Pale. Design Bridge created a enjoyable and hedonistic design that goals to move a younger feminine viewers again to the events and decadence of the Nineteen Twenties, balanced with a contemporary twist to stay related to at the moment’s rosé drinkers. 

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Jemma Akister, Senior Consumer Director at Design Bridge London, commented: “Sacha Lichine is a real trailblazer within the wine business, and he has at all times embraced artistic considering and understood the ability of design in reaching industrial success. Having partnered with him for over 20 years to construct tales and types for his Chateau d’Esclans portfolio, Sacha got here to us to launch his newest wine, The Pale. We collaborated with Sacha from the outset to create a unusual, celebratory model that might stand out on shelf this rosé season and past.”

Taking inspiration from the decadent events and speakeasies of the Nineteen Twenties, Design Bridge conceived the concept of the ‘flamboyant soirée’: an exuberant social gathering scene the place The Pale could be the right drink. Designed throughout the coronavirus pandemic, the visible idea seems to be ahead to a post-lockdown world when shoppers’ appetites for socialising can be greater than ever. Dwelling as much as its title, The Pale is exceptionally pale in color, so Design Bridge selected a putting sizzling pink and off-white color palette for the visible identification to emphasize the wine’s distinctive lightness by comparability. 

Editorial photograph

Natalie Hughes, Design Director at Design Bridge London, defined additional: “We hand-illustrated a vibrant soirée scene filled with eclectic components for individuals to find. From peacocks to taking part in playing cards, our distinctive design gives drinkers a playful journey of discovery each time they choose up the bottle.”

The weird angles of the illustration add to the power of the design, while a bespoke typeface is a modernised model of Nineteen Twenties typography, and the result’s a celebratory new model that appeals to a up to date viewers.

Luke Burley, Design Director of 3D at Design Bridge London, added: “To echo the decadence of the graphic design components, we created a bespoke 3D structural design for The Pale to additional set it other than rivals. That includes a barely squat form and tapered physique, which was partly impressed by conventional whisky decanters, the bottle’s inverted punt refracts mild into the aspects, giving the bottle a blinding high quality to raise the liquid inside. You may even see The Pale’s distinctive bottle form hidden on the tables within the label illustration, which provides to the playful secrecy of our Prohibition-inspired design.”

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Sacha Lichine commented: “As my long-term artistic collaborators, I couldn’t consider anybody higher than Design Bridge to create the model and visible identification of my new wine idea. Their evocative soirée idea completely captures the playful essence of The Pale, putting the right steadiness between nostalgia and modernity. I can’t look ahead to individuals to take their first sip this summer time and be transported proper into that second.” 

Editorial photograph

Editorial photograph

Editorial photograph



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